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An introduction to community engagement within science – supporting the human infrastructure for collaboration

Date of Webinar: 
Tuesday, November 12, 2019
Time: 
9 am Pacific / 10 am Mountain / 11am Central / 12 noon Eastern

Webinar Abstract

As science becomes increasingly complex and collaborative – spanning disciplines, organizations and locations, we’re beginning to appreciate the importance not just of technical infrastructure such as online tools, but also human infrastructure to support our group efforts. Join us for a webinar with Lou Woodley, Director of the Center for Scientific Collaboration and Community Engagement (CSCCE) where we’ll discuss the different types of communities within science and what supporting collaboration looks like in each case. Lou will also give a brief overview of CSCCE’s activities – including new online programming to support scientists who are engaging in building collaborations and community-led projects.

Biography: 
DWS Lou Woodley
Lou Woodley is Director of the Center for Scientific Collaboration and Community Engagement (CSCCE) – a research and training center to support community-building in STEM. Lou is a trained molecular biologist with research experience at Cambridge University, the European Molecular Biology Laboratory in Heidelberg, and the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona. Since leaving the bench, she’s gained extensive experience in on- and offline community engagement.
During her career so far, Lou spent 5 years at Nature Publishing Group trialing new online tools for scientists and organizing community-led events focused on the intersection of science, technology and communication. Subsequently, at AAAS, she supported the development of Trellis, an online communication and collaboration platform for scientists, as well as working on diversity and inclusion projects funded by the National Science Foundation.

Most recently, as CSCCE director, Lou leads the Community Engagement Fellows Program to train and support scientific community managers, the human infrastructure for collaboration in STEM. She also conducts research and training in scientific community engagement.

Lou explores the intersection of people, science and technology on her blog, Social in Silico, and you can also follow her on Twitter, where she’s @LouWoodley.